Colorado Just Elected A Trans Woman To The State Legislature For The First Time

Colorado Just Elected A Trans Woman To The State Legislature For The First Time

It’s been a long week of waiting, but on Friday afternoon, Brianna Titone declared victory in her race, becoming Colorado’s first openly trans lawmaker.

Titone is the fourth out trans lawmaker in the nation. The first was Virginia’s Danica Roem, elected to a state legislature last year, and on Tuesday, Gerri Cannon and Lisa Bunker, two trans candidates in New Hampshire, also won their races for state rep.  

The Colorado Democratic Party called the win in a statement posted on Twitter late Friday, pointing out the historic significance of Titone’s stance as the state’s first out trans legislator as well as the state legislature’s tilt towards a majority led by women.

“[Titone’s] vote total is currently above the margin that triggers an automatic recount,” the Colorado Democratic Party tweeted. “And we have enough confidence in her lead to call the race.”

Titone had just a 194 vote lead over over Republican challenger Vicki Pyne as of Friday.

In a statement released Friday, the Democratic party pointed out that between Titone’s win and those of fellow state legislature candidates Rochelle Galindo and Bri Buentello, the Colorado statehouse will have its largest-ever Democratic majority in addition to being women-led.

Titone’s bid for the 27th District garnered national support from LGBTQ advocacy organizations. Roem flew to Colorado to knock on doors for her in the days leading up to her campaign, while the Victory Fund and the National Center for Transgender Equality Action Fund poured energy into her campaign.  

Titone also gained the endorsements of several popular Colorado Democrats as well, including Congressman Ed Perlmutter, and the state’s newly elected governor Jared Polis — who became the first openly gay man elected governor of a U.S. state on Tuesday.

Like many trans candidates, Titone ran on a platform that emphasized her policy mandate rather than focusing on her gender and identity. Titone’s platform promises include science-based environmental policy and net neutrality, two issues familiar to Titone through her background as a geologist and information technology professional.

Other issues prominent in Titone’s platform are education funding, reducing health care costs, and political transparency.


Kate Sosin and Mary Emily O'Hara