Cindy Foster Makes Lesbian Jokes Funny Again

Cindy Foster Makes Lesbian Jokes Funny Again

Never underestimate the power of a dyke with a cell phone in the middle of the woods the content could be riveting.

Cindy Foster is the 52-year-old Massachusetts-based comedian who has created one of the latest viral videos you’ve likely seen being shared online. Her sarcastic sense of humor and charming demeanor are infectious.

In 2016, Foster recorded herself chanting lesbian hymns in the middle of the woods and posted it to her personal Facebook page. The intent was to spark some laughs within her friend group (which, she says, numbered only 80). One share led to another, and in turn, Lesbian Nature Calls has continued to go viral, reaching a staggering 3 million views.

“Being a lesbian,” she begins, “I have to come out to the woods every single morning to make sure that Iam in touch with nature, grounded into the earth and filled with lesbianism.”

She invites the viewer “to her sacred journey of lesbianism,”holds her necklace into the air and, in a Xena-like bird call, yells out “Lllllllllesbian! Ddddddyke dyke dyke dyke!”

“I never imagined this would happen,” Foster tells INTO. “I’m just this 52-year-old mom from Western Massachusetts.”

Foster always wanted to be a comedian, but didn’t pursue it until later in her life after she decided to take a stand up comedy class at her local community college. Her first gig was at a gay club in Northhampton called Diva’s.

“After the first time I performed stand up, I got off the stage and was brought to tears by all of the positive energy I was receiving. I love how I have the ability to help people escape even if it’s only for 20 or 30 minutes.”

Foster says her original comedy inspiration was Lucille Ball. “Of course I’ve always loved Ellen, too, and I miss her stand up very much,” she says. “I love what she’s doing now, though, and I am determined to someday be on her couch.”

Not all of Foster’s content has been received positively. Last year, when a Christian mom blogger canceled her family’s trip to Disneyworld after learning thatthere was a gay character in the remake of Beauty and the Beast, Foster created a spoof making fun of the issue. The video was picked up by a few hate sites and she says she received death threats.

“This situation is how I learned to not read the comments unless they’re on my personal Facebook page,” Foster says. “I do this because I love to make people laugh — I don’t want any negativity to interfere with that. At first, I wanted everyone to like me, but I got over that real quick.”

Foster’s video “Follow this guide to track your own bisexual in the woods” was another that posed the potential for some controversy. Foster made sure to express how much she supports inclusivity within the LGBTQ community.

“I remember back in the day where the bisexuals were forced to have their own Pride parade. I always thought this was wrong,” she jokes. “Why are we going to exclude 80% of our dating population?”

“Even when I do standup, the only person I make fun of is myself,” Foster says, “and my parents a little but I’m not mean.”

Foster has only been doing comedy for five years now, but this year in particular was a game-changer for her.

“I’m enjoying this ride immensely,” she says. “I was out in P-town recently and some women started crying when they saw me and wanted to touch my necklace.”

In most of Foster’s videos, she wears a metal tree of life necklace around her neck. The necklace, given to her by a friend, is easily recognizable in Lesbian Nature Calls where she uses it to assist her in lesbian chants.

“I like it because it’s kind of heavy and it keeps me grounded. Also Scott Baio, who I was always in love with and met in 1979, wore this necklace his grandmother gave him and girls loved it,” she says. “I knew I needed a decoy.”

Foster says she’s heard from many fans of Lesbian Nature Calls, including some who felt the courage to come out after watching, and another who said she appreciated the laugh while going through chemotherapy.

“That is something I just can’t possibly wrap my brain around,” she says gratefully.

In September, Foster will be performing at Worcester Pride in Worcester, Massachusetts for the sixth time. She also has plans to perform in Boston following a tour with stops in Texas, Colorado, and Canada, and the hopes of a four-day Cindy Foster Fan-Fest Cruise.

Foster is writing a sitcom with her best friend that she hopes to eventually find a home for (Netflix, she says, is ideal).

“We have a couple of amazing ideas in the works,” she says. “I want to surround myself with an all-women team on this journey.”

The journey, she says, has been fast-paced, but exciting.

“I think of it as that part on Finding Nemo when the turtles were in that current that was moving so fast,”she says. “Then along the way, I keep picking up other turtles I want to continue the ride with.”


Ashley Rose Løkken

Ashley Rose Løkken (she/her) is a freelance writer at INTO. She resides in Boston, Massachusetts where she works in public relations by day and is a writer/poet by night.

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