Supergay is Your New Superhero

We’ve been holding out for a candy colored hero for a long time now, so praise the queer gods that Supergay has come to our rescue. Check out the premiere episode of our very first animated series, and pray no one falls into the depths of Butt Creek.

Produced by East Creative @eastreativeh

Chicago… Mykki Blanco Style

Mykki Blanco and Cakes Da Killa recently brought their Stunt Queen Tour to Chicago, and some ot the city’s most avant garde nightlife personalities took over East Room in Logan Square, transforming the space into an explosion of queer creativity focused on inclusion, diversity, visibility….and throwing down.

The night was DJ’d by one of Mykki Blanco’s producers Jeremiah Meece and East Room resident Johnny Walker, both of whom represent different sides of the Chicago music scene, with live performances by Chicago drag and dance powerhouses Dida Ritz (Season Four of RuPaul’s Drag Race), and The Vixen. Chicago’s talented roster of drag queens and club kids brought over the top fashion to the night, including Trannika Rex, Lucy Stoole, JoJo Baby, Scott Cramer, Imp Queen and BonBon, and also some rising stars like Abhijeet, J4Pay, Toyota Corona, Petty Crocker, An Authentic Skidmark, and Eda Yorulmazoglu. Vibrant installations and video artwork were provided by artists Austin James and Teen Witch Fanclub.

In short: It was a night of elevated emotions, high energy, and exactly what underground Chicago nightlife comes together as.

Looking to get out in Chi-Town? Here are the parties to check out:

Queen! – Sundays at Smartbar
Fabitat – 2nd and 4th Sundays at Double Door’s Door No. 3
Femme’s Room – First Thursdays at Berlin Nightclub
Men’s Room – Time and places vary
TRQPiTECA – Time and places vary

Production credits

Vam Studio:
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Gay in the 80s: A Conversation

From Paolo Berberan:

I met Winston on a night out. We bonded because my friend was from Berlin, and he had spent some time there. He was having a drink on his own, and I was immediately intrigued by the tone of his voice.
We then exchanged numbers and maintained a friendship, and I was fascinated by the experiences and stories he subsequently told me about being a gay man in the 1980’s.
Nowadays, Winston enjoys spending most of his time alone, and memories of his younger years are now stored in a box under his bed.
I believe the social political circumstances of the time he grew up in, with the lack of freedom and rights in LGBTQ community, a slight society crisis over his racial identity, and his religious background, have somehow influenced his life’s direction.
I was compelled to tell his story to a younger LGBTQ generation, and how his generation’s strength have influenced and paved the way for a younger one. I was also very interested on representing someone with history, someone out of normal media representation, and someone one might even cross on the street – so many faces we see everyday, so many stories to be told. Everyone is entitled to tell their own story, and this film is a glimpse of Winston’s.

Music by Elijah.

LA Nights

As a foreigner in the sprawling city of concrete and palm trees, Samuel Douek has crafted a visual poem inspired by his exploration of the city’s vibrant queer scene. His journey into the shadows of the night is focused on three of LA’s most infamous establishments and events: The unpredictable and brash Mustache Mondays, gritty bear magnet Eagle, and the impossibly chic mega-party A Club Called Rhonda.

“Ultimately, LA Nights reflects my immediate isolation along a path of anonymous faces and my successive enlightenment, being enamored by the freedom, beauty, culture, and open arms of the city’s artistic underbelly where the divided populous- a megalopolis of clowns, queens, muscle hunks and big dreams – become united in their diversity.

Here we are together, forever, in the fleeting moment of this effervescent night. Because on your LA Night you can be whoever you want to be, from feigned shyness to outlandish performance. It doesn’t matter, because everybody will love you for it.”