Tom of Finland Fest Brings the Artist’s Iconic Drawings to Life

The Tom of Finland Foundation held its annual Art and Culture Festival this past weekend at its LA headquarters, and the event played out like one of Touko Laaksonen’s iconic drawings brought to life.

The focus of this year’s fest was moving pictures – a nod to the U.S. release later this month of the ToF biopic – and the programmers rounded out the art on display with live tattooing and skateboarders grinding on a halfpipe in the foundation’s leafy front yard.

Recently out-and-proud pro skater Brian Anderson was on hand as a guest artist, along with loads of covetable erotica curated by LA-based artist Rubén Esparza (not to mention the many priceless Tom of Finland works that permanently adorn the foundation’s walls).

We sent photographer Navi (www.boychoy.com) out to document the action – from the sex dungeon underneath the house to the pleasure park in the backyard – and he didn’t disappoint.


Peter Kalisch, @peter_kalisch

Brian Anderson, @nolimitsoldier

Jon Vaz Gar, @jonvazgar

Manuel Rodrigues, @dj_sadboy

Missie O’Tool

Brian Valence, @yungbambiboy

15 of Cardi B’s Most Hilarious Instagram Moments

Cardi B is makin’ records gold AND comedy gold.

Whether you love “Bodak Yellow,” hate it, or are just sick of the radio force-feeding it down your throat like you’re Shelby and you need to drink your juice, you cannot deny that Miss Cardi B is hilarious.

Here are 15 of her funniest Instagram videos to prove it.

Here are 15 of her funniest Instagram videos to prove it.
When Cardi showed the haters that when you work hard, it’s ok to treat yo’self!

When Cardi showed you how to budget, hoe.

Get your Romper @fashionnova babyyyyyy

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

Cardi really knows how to make her friends feel special.

Happy birthday for someone that I drive crazy but is just as ambitious as me @iam_kingpee The best !!!!

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

Cardi admits that sometimes the things we do for beauty can be annoying…

GANGSTABITCHMUSICVOL2

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

Cardi knows sometimes it’s hard living in New York City, but she doesn’t mind sharing her survival secrets.

She was also personally victimized by her own Regina Georges in high school.

Anyways who went to Renaissance in Lehman High School ?

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

Cardi LOVES the Queen of Pop, Madonna! (Watch a Madonna & Cardi collab come out on Madge’s next album…)

My mother is a big Madonna fan and she past it to me ❤️❤️❤️

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

She’s a feminist and supports ALL of her fellow women.

YAAA Sooo AGGY

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

She’s the BEST Flat Tummy Tea spokesperson on Instagram, hands down!

She’s humble about her lewks.

😩I’m annoying today

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

She’s grateful for the people who help her.

She composes stunning ballads dedicated to her haters.

NOOOBOOODYYY!!!!

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

She loves her body.

I love them my BESTFRIENDS

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

She does Fifth Harmony parodies.

💪🏽💪🏽💪🏽💪🏽#ganstabitchmusicvol1

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

She was genuine, hilarious, and sang Taylor Swift when she found out she was #1 – all while keeping her yabbos in check.

Egypt Bans Media From ‘Promoting Homosexuality’ Following Anti-LGBTQ Arrests

Egyptian authorities have banned the media from “any promotion of homosexuality” following a series of anti-LGBTQ raids in the Muslim nation.

Calling homosexuality a “shameful disease,” the Supreme Council for Media Regulation prohibited local news programs and media publications from expressing support for Egypt’s queer and trans population. Homosexuals, the council argued, should only appear on television to express repentance.

SCMR President Makram Mohamed Ahmed said the media’s role should be to combat the spread of homosexuality by putting forward the “right values.”

“Egyptian media outlets should highlight the hazards of spreading such a phenomenon, the recent promotional campaigns that support the LGBTQ presence in Egypt tried to categorize the LGBTQ presence as a kind of human rights,” Ahmed claimed in a statement. “This is not real, as homosexuality contradicts with humanity and religions.”

The statement was released following a number of recent incidents in which LGBTQ people were targeted by Egyptian police.

At least 22 people were arrested on Sept. 22 at a concert for the alternative rock band Mashrou’ Leila after attendees held up a Pride flag in solidarity with the LGBTQ community. The Lebanese music group’s lead singer, Hamed Sinno, is openly gay. Police reportedly used security footage and social media posts to identify the parties holding the flag.

Although homosexuality is legal in Egypt, authorities frequently exploit the existing legal framework to target queer and trans people.

In the late ‘90s, police began to target LGBTQ individuals for violating the prohibition against “debauchery,” a 1961 law that’s vague enough to be applied to any behavior the local government doesn’t like. Fifty-two gay men were charged under the ordinance in 2001 when law enforcement officials raided a gay club called the Queen Boat.

One of the flag holders apprehended at the Mashrou’ Leila concert has already been convicted and sentenced. At a Sept. 26 trial, he received six years in prison and six additional years of probation.

The defendant did not have access to a lawyer, as Human Rights Watch claims.

Of the 22 people arrested in September, 17 are currently being tried in Cairo’s Azbakia Misdemeanour Court for what authorities claim is “incitement to debauchery.” Proceedings began Sunday. Details are scant on the trial, which is closed to the media, but a verdict is set to be reached on October 29.

Detainees were forced to undergo anal examinations to verify their homosexuality, as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International report. Human rights groups have likened the practice to torture.

These groups have called for LGBTQ prisoners to be released.

“Whether they were waving a rainbow flag, chatting on a dating app, or minding their own business in the streets, all these debauchery arrest victims should be immediately released,” said Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director of Human Rights Watch’s Middle East and North Africa Division, in a press release. “The Egyptian government, by rounding people up based on their presumed sexual orientation, is showing flagrant disregard for their rights.”

“The fact that Egypt’s public prosecutor is prioritizing hunting down people based on their perceived sexual orientation is utterly deplorable,” added Amnesty International in a statement.

Human Rights Watch estimates that 34 people have been jailed for violating the debauchery law in the past year and hundreds more have been imprisoned since 2014, when President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi took office. His regime has been noted for its repressive treatment of the LGBTQ community, which has forced numerous queer and trans people into hiding.

‘Girls Trip’ Writer Penning ‘First Wives Club’ TV Show and I’m Screaming

Girls Trip was the funniest movie of the summer. Almost every movie that wasn’t about a superhero that came out this summer tanked except for the excellent gross-out comedy, starring Regina Hall, Tiffany Haddish, Jada Pinkett Smith and Queen Latifah. Now, the writer behind the movie is being trusted with a high-profile revival project: The First Wives Club.

Deadline reports that Tracy Oliver, Girl Trip’s scribe, will write The First Wives Club for Paramount Network, where it was moved after TV Land passed on the pilot. According to Deadline, the network will debut in January as Viacom’s “leading scripted cable brand,” and will pick up shows like the Heathers TV series.

Like the original film, the First Wives Club TV reboot will follow a group of New York women who come together to exact revenge on their no-good husbands.

On Twitter, Oliver expressed extreme joy to be adapting the show and promised a diverse cast.

Unlike the upcoming Hocus Pocus, this is one Bette Midler revival we’re looking forward to seeing.

Living For: Scott Ramsay Kyle

Porn and embroidery might seem like strange bedfellows, but they make perfect sense together at the hand of London artist/designer Scott Ramsay Kyle.

Kyle takes the hypermasculine imagery of vintage gay porn and softens it with handsewn embellishments that throw the genre’s macho tendencies into queer relief. Think circle jerk meets knitting society and you’re somewhere in the vicinity.

Check out his work below along with our interview, where he gets cerebral about Aldous Huxley, his thoughts on “Masc4Masc,” and the relationship between the sewing needle and the penis.

What are you working on at the moment?
Many projects. Over the summer I worked on several art direction projects coming out soon. Also a second edition of a collaborative zine called OBSESSIONS II, with two other great artists, Melanie Coles and Michael Crowe. We launched the first edition back in July in London at ASP3.

There is also a beautiful T-shirt collaboration with London designer Ashish that is being released in the next few weeks. I work in Paris as a consultant so back and forth there from my home in London, and I’ll be in New York mid-October for more hustling and some fun too.

Your work is very sexy. What made you start using sexuality as a focal point?
A couple of years ago I started a practice-based PhD, making work in response to research questions I had set myself. As I got further into the research, I realized that I wanted to make physical work and do less reading and contextualizing in the formal academic way. I stalled the PhD but continued to develop my practice.

The original project was called The Doors and Men of Paradise. These were ideas developed from reading Aldous Huxley’s The Doors of Perception while on a mescaline trip and looking into his journey between an active and contemplative life. I asked myself why I wanted to work in the medium of embroidery and what my interests were in it.

By doing so, I compared the physical action of hand sewing to that of masturbation; the posture, control of breath, the intensity of thought and focus as well as when my right arm, wrist, and hand move up and down over and over in repeat; then when the ‘money shot’ comes, the release of cum was similar to the final stitch marks onto the surface.

As I was thinking about perception, repetition, craft, and masturbation as performance, the sexual imagery eventually arrived. I related the sewing needle to my penis as it is penetrating a surface to create joy whether that is with making artwork or fucking. Both bring beauty and connect the head, the heart, the ego, and the penis.

These images look like they’ve been taken out of vintage erotic magazines, do you collect these?
The images I work with are taken from my own adolescent collection of porn. I had many magazines (wank rags) that I had held onto since my early teens, they were in a huge bag in my studio. I look at those men now and have very little sexual interest towards them, but I admire them as they helped get me off for years (this is pre-internet days when I was growing up in a small Scottish town). There were very few ‘out’ gay lads to mess around with, the general area was pretty homophobic, so it was difficult to get my sexual kicks and explore.

As I have become more sexually secure and fulfilled, I don’t feel aroused by the images I work with; instead I appreciate what they meant for my younger self. I guess by adding embroidery thread and collage techniques it humanizes the 2-dimensional male muses and shows this admiration.

Are they hard to come by?
I bought them when I was young or stole them from local newsagents at the time. The idea of buying a top shelf porn magazine now feels so outdated, like beautiful relics. The Internet, smartphones and apps like Grindr and Scruff changed the naked image and how it is exchanged and viewed in our modern world. Everyone is so naked nowadays and comfortable with it.

When did you start using embroidery?
I’ve been using embroidery in my practice for over 15 years, having trained at two excellent art schools. It taught me many skills in multi-disciplinary working methods, allowing me to work across many creative projects and outputs, some consultancy work, collaborative, editorial. But hand embroidery is my most personal process. It is a masochist art form, it requires endurance, physicality, and patience. I relate to this role of being a masochist, my favorite quote from Venus in Furs says, ”The moral of the tale is this: whoever allows himself to be whipped, deserves to be whipped.”

I am always very active and prolific in developing my work and can be my own worst enemy in the creative process. I see working with my hands and engaging my thoughts as a confessional process, I use text which holds undertones of sentiment, I think for me it is important to present myself through my work, and I see everything I do take on a linear form. For me it is all a continuation of myself at the present time into future self. I really do sound self-obsessed.

You use vintage porn with masculine overtones but then manipulate the images using a technique that is traditionally considered feminine. Is this subversion intentional?
There are records of working men originally doing embroidery and craft work from earlier than 1300AD. It’s a more modern day assumption that it is solely a feminine skill. With my embroidery and embellishment I have free rein to use a mixture of materials and manipulate photographs and magazine cuttings to recreate my own depictions of visual culture, image making, and organic matter juxtaposed with man-made materials.

My work today deals with the masculine body; questioning sexuality, the nude and naked male muse, re-appropriated imagery, and how I can make these confessional and relevant to my sense of self in the present context of how our society depicts what is deemed masculine. My work has both masculine and feminine connotations, which can be advantageous.

Do you ever feel guilty about using images that might now be out of print?
I can’t imagine many of these magazines survived unless archived by collectors or erotic fans/erotic museums. There is no guilt from me, just appreciationI’m headstrong and hate to regret. I hope I am making these images relevant again.

When I stitch over the cock, an orifice, or sexual positions they are being recreated over a new surface, which allows the images to become more of a pleasing erotic desirable object with the originally intended image hidden underneath It’s like redecorating the bodies I use.

You deal with masculinity and sexuality in your practice, and “Masc4Masc” has become a controversial topic in queer culture, with many calling it homophobic or self-hating. Does your work express a point of view on this issue?
I believe my work represents how I feel about maleness and the naked male body. I want to celebrate the male form, the muscle, the proportions, the exchange, and the queer gaze. As I have crossed my work between fashion and art projects for years, it seems like the natural progression to still decorate onto the body. The fact that these bodies may be engaging in sexual acts doesn’t bother me. I’m no prude, it’s the viewer who should assess their own judgments.

I’ve had images of men just kissing removed from my Instagram, which is outrageous, but there are still small-minded bigots around. As I work mainly on the nude male, I elevate them within my work, they become even more beautiful, they are adorned with embellishment, and they do not conform to a ‘hetero-normative’ ideal or preconception of what straight art ‘should be’.

The Ancient Greeks worked with plaster on the male formthe naked form has always been aroundand many people have double standards when it comes to nudity. “Masc4Masc” works are exciting to see when creative people make interesting works, but I hope it’s not just a hashtag trend. I don’t want to pigeonhole my work as a trend, I am drawn to both the masculine and feminine within my work, it needs duality to survive.

Is your work inspired by your sex life?
I’m versatile in sex, and often when I focus the artwork on either the cock or the arse, that may be telling about how I am feeling at that particular time. In saying that, as I mentioned above I’m no longer aroused by the porn images I work with as I’ve outgrown them.

I admire the men I wanked over years ago; I’ve made them like talismans, which is true to say of some of the previous guys I have slept with. Sex can be an opium chase, sometimes striving for that amazing hit that an ex partner gave you. I do like beauty in sex, attention to detail and good effort, so that is present in my work I suppose. I have only been heart broken once, so my work does show that loss occasionally.

Do you use hook-up apps?
I have in the past but not for a while, I prefer to meet guys out or through friends. I have an addictive personality and aspects of apps and social media can bring great benefits, but also big distraction. I find the famous ”any more pics?” equally frustrating and hilarious as I have/still do ask the same question.

You’ve made some really interesting garments and masks in the pastit’s almost like your collage works come to life. Have you always had an interest in fashion?
I trained at Central Saint Martins in MA Fashion, which is one of the best fashion courses in the world. I was so happy to get there at the time. My work has always been more arts and crafts driven, I think that’s why fashion people find it exciting to fuse my work into their collections.

I prefer to work in 2D, so working on paper and cloth is easier for me. Making garments in 3D requires another section of my brain that I only tap into sometimes. I consider my stitch marks as a form of painting, which is why I relate more to art than fashion, but from my understanding of fashion I can identify trends, good research skills, and recognizing the odd moments of zeitgeist.

What can we expect from you in the future?
Much more of the same but bigger, bolder, and blonder. More sex, more art, more fun in general. I have some work featured in a group show coming up in Berlin November 3-5 at the COLONIA SPACE; this is a project curated by Nicolaus Simoneau from KALTBLUT Magazine.

I am also planning my own London show early in 2018 and considering turning my studio into a temporary gallery space. I launched my own website where collectors can buy the work directly from me and cut out gallery fees and commissions, which feels great. You can follow the link: www.scottramsaykyle.work and treat yourself.

@scottramsaykyle

Living For: Scott Ramsay Kyle

Porn and embroidery might seem like strange bedfellows, but they make perfect sense together at the hand of London artist/designer Scott Ramsay Kyle.

Kyle takes the hypermasculine imagery of vintage gay porn and softens it with handsewn embellishments that throw the genre’s macho tendencies into queer relief. Think circle jerk meets knitting society and you’re somewhere in the vicinity.

Check out his work below along with our interview, where he gets cerebral about Aldous Huxley, his thoughts on “Masc4Masc,” and the relationship between the sewing needle and the penis.

What are you working on at the moment?
Many projects. Over the summer I worked on several art direction projects coming out soon. Also a second edition of a collaborative zine called OBSESSIONS II, with two other great artists, Melanie Coles and Michael Crowe. We launched the first edition back in July in London at ASP3.

There is also a beautiful T-shirt collaboration with London designer Ashish that is being released in the next few weeks. I work in Paris as a consultant so back and forth there from my home in London, and I’ll be in New York mid-October for more hustling and some fun too.

Your work is very sexy. What made you start using sexuality as a focal point?
A couple of years ago I started a practice-based PhD, making work in response to research questions I had set myself. As I got further into the research, I realized that I wanted to make physical work and do less reading and contextualizing in the formal academic way. I stalled the PhD but continued to develop my practice.

The original project was called The Doors and Men of Paradise. These were ideas developed from reading Aldous Huxley’s The Doors of Perception while on a mescaline trip and looking into his journey between an active and contemplative life. I asked myself why I wanted to work in the medium of embroidery and what my interests were in it.

By doing so, I compared the physical action of hand sewing to that of masturbation; the posture, control of breath, the intensity of thought and focus as well as when my right arm, wrist, and hand move up and down over and over in repeat; then when the ‘money shot’ comes, the release of cum was similar to the final stitch marks onto the surface.

As I was thinking about perception, repetition, craft, and masturbation as performance, the sexual imagery eventually arrived. I related the sewing needle to my penis as it is penetrating a surface to create joy whether that is with making artwork or fucking. Both bring beauty and connect the head, the heart, the ego, and the penis.

These images look like they’ve been taken out of vintage erotic magazines, do you collect these?
The images I work with are taken from my own adolescent collection of porn. I had many magazines (wank rags) that I had held onto since my early teens, they were in a huge bag in my studio. I look at those men now and have very little sexual interest towards them, but I admire them as they helped get me off for years (this is pre-internet days when I was growing up in a small Scottish town). There were very few ‘out’ gay lads to mess around with, the general area was pretty homophobic, so it was difficult to get my sexual kicks and explore.

As I have become more sexually secure and fulfilled, I don’t feel aroused by the images I work with; instead I appreciate what they meant for my younger self. I guess by adding embroidery thread and collage techniques it humanizes the 2-dimensional male muses and shows this admiration.

Are they hard to come by?
I bought them when I was young or stole them from local newsagents at the time. The idea of buying a top shelf porn magazine now feels so outdated, like beautiful relics. The Internet, smartphones and apps like Grindr and Scruff changed the naked image and how it is exchanged and viewed in our modern world. Everyone is so naked nowadays and comfortable with it.

When did you start using embroidery?
I’ve been using embroidery in my practice for over 15 years, having trained at two excellent art schools. It taught me many skills in multi-disciplinary working methods, allowing me to work across many creative projects and outputs, some consultancy work, collaborative, editorial. But hand embroidery is my most personal process. It is a masochist art form, it requires endurance, physicality, and patience. I relate to this role of being a masochist, my favorite quote from Venus in Furs says, ”The moral of the tale is this: whoever allows himself to be whipped, deserves to be whipped.”

I am always very active and prolific in developing my work and can be my own worst enemy in the creative process. I see working with my hands and engaging my thoughts as a confessional process, I use text which holds undertones of sentiment, I think for me it is important to present myself through my work, and I see everything I do take on a linear form. For me it is all a continuation of myself at the present time into future self. I really do sound self-obsessed.

You use vintage porn with masculine overtones but then manipulate the images using a technique that is traditionally considered feminine. Is this subversion intentional?
There are records of working men originally doing embroidery and craft work from earlier than 1300AD. It’s a more modern day assumption that it is solely a feminine skill. With my embroidery and embellishment I have free rein to use a mixture of materials and manipulate photographs and magazine cuttings to recreate my own depictions of visual culture, image making, and organic matter juxtaposed with man-made materials.

My work today deals with the masculine body; questioning sexuality, the nude and naked male muse, re-appropriated imagery, and how I can make these confessional and relevant to my sense of self in the present context of how our society depicts what is deemed masculine. My work has both masculine and feminine connotations, which can be advantageous.

Do you ever feel guilty about using images that might now be out of print?
I can’t imagine many of these magazines survived unless archived by collectors or erotic fans/erotic museums. There is no guilt from me, just appreciationI’m headstrong and hate to regret. I hope I am making these images relevant again.

When I stitch over the cock, an orifice, or sexual positions they are being recreated over a new surface, which allows the images to become more of a pleasing erotic desirable object with the originally intended image hidden underneath It’s like redecorating the bodies I use.

You deal with masculinity and sexuality in your practice, and “Masc4Masc” has become a controversial topic in queer culture, with many calling it homophobic or self-hating. Does your work express a point of view on this issue?
I believe my work represents how I feel about maleness and the naked male body. I want to celebrate the male form, the muscle, the proportions, the exchange, and the queer gaze. As I have crossed my work between fashion and art projects for years, it seems like the natural progression to still decorate onto the body. The fact that these bodies may be engaging in sexual acts doesn’t bother me. I’m no prude, it’s the viewer who should assess their own judgments.

I’ve had images of men just kissing removed from my Instagram, which is outrageous, but there are still small-minded bigots around. As I work mainly on the nude male, I elevate them within my work, they become even more beautiful, they are adorned with embellishment, and they do not conform to a ‘hetero-normative’ ideal or preconception of what straight art ‘should be’.

The Ancient Greeks worked with plaster on the male formthe naked form has always been aroundand many people have double standards when it comes to nudity. “Masc4Masc” works are exciting to see when creative people make interesting works, but I hope it’s not just a hashtag trend. I don’t want to pigeonhole my work as a trend, I am drawn to both the masculine and feminine within my work, it needs duality to survive.

Is your work inspired by your sex life?
I’m versatile in sex, and often when I focus the artwork on either the cock or the arse, that may be telling about how I am feeling at that particular time. In saying that, as I mentioned above I’m no longer aroused by the porn images I work with as I’ve outgrown them.

I admire the men I wanked over years ago; I’ve made them like talismans, which is true to say of some of the previous guys I have slept with. Sex can be an opium chase, sometimes striving for that amazing hit that an ex partner gave you. I do like beauty in sex, attention to detail and good effort, so that is present in my work I suppose. I have only been heart broken once, so my work does show that loss occasionally.

Do you use hook-up apps?
I have in the past but not for a while, I prefer to meet guys out or through friends. I have an addictive personality and aspects of apps and social media can bring great benefits, but also big distraction. I find the famous ”any more pics?” equally frustrating and hilarious as I have/still do ask the same question.

You’ve made some really interesting garments and masks in the pastit’s almost like your collage works come to life. Have you always had an interest in fashion?
I trained at Central Saint Martins in MA Fashion, which is one of the best fashion courses in the world. I was so happy to get there at the time. My work has always been more arts and crafts driven, I think that’s why fashion people find it exciting to fuse my work into their collections.

I prefer to work in 2D, so working on paper and cloth is easier for me. Making garments in 3D requires another section of my brain that I only tap into sometimes. I consider my stitch marks as a form of painting, which is why I relate more to art than fashion, but from my understanding of fashion I can identify trends, good research skills, and recognizing the odd moments of zeitgeist.

What can we expect from you in the future?
Much more of the same but bigger, bolder, and blonder. More sex, more art, more fun in general. I have some work featured in a group show coming up in Berlin November 3-5 at the COLONIA SPACE; this is a project curated by Nicolaus Simoneau from KALTBLUT Magazine.

I am also planning my own London show early in 2018 and considering turning my studio into a temporary gallery space. I launched my own website where collectors can buy the work directly from me and cut out gallery fees and commissions, which feels great. You can follow the link: www.scottramsaykyle.work and treat yourself.

@scottramsaykyle

Living For: Scott Ramsay Kyle

Porn and embroidery might seem like strange bedfellows, but they make perfect sense together at the hand of London artist/designer Scott Ramsay Kyle.

Kyle takes the hypermasculine imagery of vintage gay porn and softens it with handsewn embellishments that throw the genre’s macho tendencies into queer relief. Think circle jerk meets knitting society and you’re somewhere in the vicinity.

Check out his work below along with our interview, where he gets cerebral about Aldous Huxley, his thoughts on “Masc4Masc,” and the relationship between the sewing needle and the penis.

What are you working on at the moment?
Many projects. Over the summer I worked on several art direction projects coming out soon. Also a second edition of a collaborative zine called OBSESSIONS II, with two other great artists, Melanie Coles and Michael Crowe. We launched the first edition back in July in London at ASP3.

There is also a beautiful T-shirt collaboration with London designer Ashish that is being released in the next few weeks. I work in Paris as a consultant so back and forth there from my home in London, and I’ll be in New York mid-October for more hustling and some fun too.

Your work is very sexy. What made you start using sexuality as a focal point?
A couple of years ago I started a practice-based PhD, making work in response to research questions I had set myself. As I got further into the research, I realized that I wanted to make physical work and do less reading and contextualizing in the formal academic way. I stalled the PhD but continued to develop my practice.

The original project was called The Doors and Men of Paradise. These were ideas developed from reading Aldous Huxley’s The Doors of Perception while on a mescaline trip and looking into his journey between an active and contemplative life. I asked myself why I wanted to work in the medium of embroidery and what my interests were in it.

By doing so, I compared the physical action of hand sewing to that of masturbation; the posture, control of breath, the intensity of thought and focus as well as when my right arm, wrist, and hand move up and down over and over in repeat; then when the ‘money shot’ comes, the release of cum was similar to the final stitch marks onto the surface.

As I was thinking about perception, repetition, craft, and masturbation as performance, the sexual imagery eventually arrived. I related the sewing needle to my penis as it is penetrating a surface to create joy whether that is with making artwork or fucking. Both bring beauty and connect the head, the heart, the ego, and the penis.

These images look like they’ve been taken out of vintage erotic magazines, do you collect these?
The images I work with are taken from my own adolescent collection of porn. I had many magazines (wank rags) that I had held onto since my early teens, they were in a huge bag in my studio. I look at those men now and have very little sexual interest towards them, but I admire them as they helped get me off for years (this is pre-internet days when I was growing up in a small Scottish town). There were very few ‘out’ gay lads to mess around with, the general area was pretty homophobic, so it was difficult to get my sexual kicks and explore.

As I have become more sexually secure and fulfilled, I don’t feel aroused by the images I work with; instead I appreciate what they meant for my younger self. I guess by adding embroidery thread and collage techniques it humanizes the 2-dimensional male muses and shows this admiration.

Are they hard to come by?
I bought them when I was young or stole them from local newsagents at the time. The idea of buying a top shelf porn magazine now feels so outdated, like beautiful relics. The Internet, smartphones and apps like Grindr and Scruff changed the naked image and how it is exchanged and viewed in our modern world. Everyone is so naked nowadays and comfortable with it.

When did you start using embroidery?
I’ve been using embroidery in my practice for over 15 years, having trained at two excellent art schools. It taught me many skills in multi-disciplinary working methods, allowing me to work across many creative projects and outputs, some consultancy work, collaborative, editorial. But hand embroidery is my most personal process. It is a masochist art form, it requires endurance, physicality, and patience. I relate to this role of being a masochist, my favorite quote from Venus in Furs says, ”The moral of the tale is this: whoever allows himself to be whipped, deserves to be whipped.”

I am always very active and prolific in developing my work and can be my own worst enemy in the creative process. I see working with my hands and engaging my thoughts as a confessional process, I use text which holds undertones of sentiment, I think for me it is important to present myself through my work, and I see everything I do take on a linear form. For me it is all a continuation of myself at the present time into future self. I really do sound self-obsessed.

You use vintage porn with masculine overtones but then manipulate the images using a technique that is traditionally considered feminine. Is this subversion intentional?
There are records of working men originally doing embroidery and craft work from earlier than 1300AD. It’s a more modern day assumption that it is solely a feminine skill. With my embroidery and embellishment I have free rein to use a mixture of materials and manipulate photographs and magazine cuttings to recreate my own depictions of visual culture, image making, and organic matter juxtaposed with man-made materials.

My work today deals with the masculine body; questioning sexuality, the nude and naked male muse, re-appropriated imagery, and how I can make these confessional and relevant to my sense of self in the present context of how our society depicts what is deemed masculine. My work has both masculine and feminine connotations, which can be advantageous.

Do you ever feel guilty about using images that might now be out of print?
I can’t imagine many of these magazines survived unless archived by collectors or erotic fans/erotic museums. There is no guilt from me, just appreciationI’m headstrong and hate to regret. I hope I am making these images relevant again.

When I stitch over the cock, an orifice, or sexual positions they are being recreated over a new surface, which allows the images to become more of a pleasing erotic desirable object with the originally intended image hidden underneath It’s like redecorating the bodies I use.

You deal with masculinity and sexuality in your practice, and “Masc4Masc” has become a controversial topic in queer culture, with many calling it homophobic or self-hating. Does your work express a point of view on this issue?
I believe my work represents how I feel about maleness and the naked male body. I want to celebrate the male form, the muscle, the proportions, the exchange, and the queer gaze. As I have crossed my work between fashion and art projects for years, it seems like the natural progression to still decorate onto the body. The fact that these bodies may be engaging in sexual acts doesn’t bother me. I’m no prude, it’s the viewer who should assess their own judgments.

I’ve had images of men just kissing removed from my Instagram, which is outrageous, but there are still small-minded bigots around. As I work mainly on the nude male, I elevate them within my work, they become even more beautiful, they are adorned with embellishment, and they do not conform to a ‘hetero-normative’ ideal or preconception of what straight art ‘should be’.

The Ancient Greeks worked with plaster on the male formthe naked form has always been aroundand many people have double standards when it comes to nudity. “Masc4Masc” works are exciting to see when creative people make interesting works, but I hope it’s not just a hashtag trend. I don’t want to pigeonhole my work as a trend, I am drawn to both the masculine and feminine within my work, it needs duality to survive.

Is your work inspired by your sex life?
I’m versatile in sex, and often when I focus the artwork on either the cock or the arse, that may be telling about how I am feeling at that particular time. In saying that, as I mentioned above I’m no longer aroused by the porn images I work with as I’ve outgrown them.

I admire the men I wanked over years ago; I’ve made them like talismans, which is true to say of some of the previous guys I have slept with. Sex can be an opium chase, sometimes striving for that amazing hit that an ex partner gave you. I do like beauty in sex, attention to detail and good effort, so that is present in my work I suppose. I have only been heart broken once, so my work does show that loss occasionally.

Do you use hook-up apps?
I have in the past but not for a while, I prefer to meet guys out or through friends. I have an addictive personality and aspects of apps and social media can bring great benefits, but also big distraction. I find the famous ”any more pics?” equally frustrating and hilarious as I have/still do ask the same question.

You’ve made some really interesting garments and masks in the pastit’s almost like your collage works come to life. Have you always had an interest in fashion?
I trained at Central Saint Martins in MA Fashion, which is one of the best fashion courses in the world. I was so happy to get there at the time. My work has always been more arts and crafts driven, I think that’s why fashion people find it exciting to fuse my work into their collections.

I prefer to work in 2D, so working on paper and cloth is easier for me. Making garments in 3D requires another section of my brain that I only tap into sometimes. I consider my stitch marks as a form of painting, which is why I relate more to art than fashion, but from my understanding of fashion I can identify trends, good research skills, and recognizing the odd moments of zeitgeist.

What can we expect from you in the future?
Much more of the same but bigger, bolder, and blonder. More sex, more art, more fun in general. I have some work featured in a group show coming up in Berlin November 3-5 at the COLONIA SPACE; this is a project curated by Nicolaus Simoneau from KALTBLUT Magazine.

I am also planning my own London show early in 2018 and considering turning my studio into a temporary gallery space. I launched my own website where collectors can buy the work directly from me and cut out gallery fees and commissions, which feels great. You can follow the link: www.scottramsaykyle.work and treat yourself.

@scottramsaykyle

In Mariah Carey’s World, It’s Christmas in October

Christmas seems to be coming earlier and earlier every year. But most people at least know to respect that it definitely comes after Halloween except for carol queen Mariah Carey.

While appearing on Good Morning Britain to promote an upcoming UK tour, the elusive chanteuse was seen lounging on a chaise in front of a fully decorated Christmas tree in her Los Angeles home.

Twitter seemed to notice the detail right away.

Clearly, given how much money “All I Want for Christmas Is You” pulls in for her every holiday season, Carey is keen for the year-end festivities to start early.

The hosts of the segment, Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid, have caught quite a bit of flack for the segment, in which they asked Carey about the shooting on the Las Vegas strip that happened Sunday evening. The pre-taped segment put Carey on the spot to respond to the event, while news was still breaking.

“It’s terrible because people are just going out to listen to music and that’s what they want to do,” Carey said in response to the shooting. “Really, they’re out for the night and something shocking like this happens and nobody could have expected it. It’s just wrong. I don’t really know what to say.”

Carey later released a statement about the incident on Twitter.

Milo Yiannopoulos Marries Faceless Black Man in Hawaii

Over the weekend, totally not racist right-wing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos married his long-term partner, Faceless Black Man. Yiannopoulos shared snaps from the ceremony on his Instagram.

🥂

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IT’S OFFICIAL

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Yiannopoulos has never kept quiet about his love for faceless black men, and his “antiwhite bedroom policy,” though he’s expressed that attraction in the grossest possible terms.

“I don’t like Planned Parenthood. They kill all those black babies. In 20 years, they could be my harem,” he told Bloomberg in 2016. Also that year, he posted onto his Facebook, “I lift young black men out of poverty every day. Sure, the next morning the driver takes them right back there but whatever.”

Yiannopoulos followed up his public performance of humanity with typical panache: he insulted a trans Twitter user on his Instagram and posted multiple shots of headlines about his wedding, reiterating that his love for a black man meant that he was not racist toward black people.

The fact that trannies can’t recognize and don’t appreciate Gucci just proves they are mentally ill

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WORST WHITE SUPREMACIST EVER

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Yiannopoulos’ book Dangerous came out in July to low sales after publishers Simon & Schuster dropped him in February after a video surfaced in which Yiannopoulos made controversial comments about sex between adult men and underage boys.

Gay Republican Website Falsely Accuses ‘Far-Left Loon’ for Las Vegas Shooting

A gay Republican website blamed an anti-Trump liberal for the mass shooting in Las Vegas, but there’s a problem with the allegations: They aren’t true.

The Gateway Pundit, run by conservative blogger Jim Hoft, accused Geary Danley of murdering 58 people (at the time of writing) in an attack on a country music concert Sunday night. At around 10:08 p.m., a gunman opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, targeting a crowd of 22,000 attending Route 91 Harvest. The concert was a three-day music festival featuring names like Jason Aldean, Jake Owen, and Sam Hunt.

In a post which has since been removed, the website pointed to Danley’s politics as inspiring the shooting, in which at least 400 people were injured. The Gateway Pundit called the alleged gunman a “far-left loon.”

“Everipedia.com reports that Geary was another angry far-left shooter,” Hoft wrote.

The Republican pointed to the pages Danley liked on Facebook as evidence of his guilt, a claim that was totally unsubstantiated: “Rachel Maddow, People’s Action, Democrats, [and] MoveOn.org.”

The post quickly spread across social media. ThinkProgress reports that Hoft’s article was posted in at least six 4chan forums, including its Politically Incorrect thread. 4chan, an even more extremist alternative to Reddit, is known for being a safe haven for violent trolls, who harass victims with little impunity. It’s also a breeding ground for pro-Trump propaganda.

The Gateway Pundit allegations were subsequently promoted by Google News.

But the homocon website had the wrong man. On Monday morning, police identified Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old white male from Mesquite, Nevada, as the shooter responsible. Everipedia, a Wikipedia competitor that has received the Breitbart seal of approval, subsequently removed Danley’s name from its post.

This is just the latest time the Gateway Pundit has attempted to blame a horrific act of violence on Democrats.

Following the death of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Va., the website claimed that the driver who plowed through a crowd of counter-protesters on Aug. 12 was an “anti-Trump protester,” naming a Michigan man as responsible. Hoft wrote that he “hit the wrong crowd.”

The assailant was actually James Alex Fields Jr., a 20-year-old white supremacist from Maumee, Ohio. He was photographed at the rally with the pro-fascist group Vanguard America.

Hoft, a longtime conservative activist, came out in 2016 following the attack on Pulse Nightclub. Following the death of 49 people at the Orlando gay bar, he claimed that it was time for the LGBTQ community to “come home” to the Republican Party. Members of that party offered “thoughts and prayers” following the Las Vegas shooting, with President Trump expressing “warm condolences” to the victims and their families.

The Gateway Pundit, which has spent recent days attacking the mayor of San Juan in ailing Puerto Rico, was given press credentials by the White House earlier this year.